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to ut. >> reporter: conservative groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambitiono major in science and engineering. >> almost a decade ago, then justice sandra day o'connor wrote a majority opinion that said that the university of michigan law school had a compelling interest in promoting class diversity and suggested affirmative action might still be needed for another 25 years. o'connor has since left the court, leading to speculation that the court's conservatives could now strike a blow to preferences. joe johns, cnn, washington. >> thank you, joe johns. so jeff toobin, this is the question. does this texas case raise any new and diinctive questions about this, about affirmative action, or is this one of those second bites at the apple, merely another opportunity for a different supreme court with brand-new justices
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
. >> to me, it's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs it, if they're sick. and i think people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot, they have to wear a mask. one hospital commented saying, so far all employees have been compliant. >>> the number of cases of fungal meningitis is growing. the cdc reports 47 people have been infected and 12 more than its last update. but as many as 300 people were injected with the tainted steroid that is spreading the disease. it was distributed in 23 states, but has been recalled. five people have died. our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta has more on this. >> randi, it's worth pointing out, again, that we're talking about fungal meningitis as opposed to bacterial meningitis or viral meningitis. the type that you typically hear about being spread, for example, on college campuses. fungal meningit
's against your civil rights. i don't want to get the flu shot. and to me it seems like i'm being forced into putting a virus in my body that i object to. >> we need to have a workforce available when the public needs fit they are sick and people choose to work in a hospital. >> if workers have a medical condition that prevents them from getting the shot they have to wear a mask. >>> the unemployment rate fell in september. more people returned to the labor force and hiring was steady. in this week's smart is the new rich meet one guy who took a big risk to make a career change in a brightening job market. here's christine romans. >> reporter: he wanted to switch careers from operations in i.t. to marketing and big data. in a slow jobs market that takes training and risk. >> i decided to go back to business school and i went part time and realized that i needed even more training so i left my full time position and gained internship at cbs. and that was a great gateway. so the internship plus the mba, i was able to fortunately land at met life. looking at the data more on the marketing
of violating their civil rights by coercing their confessions. the city has defended 9 way it's conducted its investigation. the filmmaker refuse to share outtakes citing shield laws. >> we believe we are protected under the shield laws as journalists and we don't think it's fair for the government to intrude in our research. >> reporter: a lawyer for the city says the film isn't journalism because it advocates for the five. in a statement, the city says, quote, if the plaintiffs truly want an open airing of the facts, they should encourage the filmmakers not to hide anything. the filmmakers claim the documentary sticks to the facts. what do you make of the city trying to go after the outtakes for this film? >> the city needs to stop dragging their feet. i don't think they would find anything other than what they already know, that we were innocent and this is just going to continue to further restate that. >> reporter: yusef says no matter the outcome, he may never fully escape his nightmare that started in in park. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. >>> the world watches cape canaveral, florid
groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambition to major in science and engineering. >> joe johns is live outside of the supreme court for us. so joe, will this decision -- it probably will -- have implications on all college campuses? >> reporter: well, it certainly could. and you know, i have to say, this is such a hotly contested issue even now, and it has been over the years. just that last statement from the commissioner is disputed, you know. the academic mismatch, as it's called, is disputed among people on the other side who say it's unsound science. so just about every single point you look at across the board on the issue of affirmative action and preferences is disputed here in this courtroom right now. what does it come down to? perhaps a very even split. and we do know that justice elena kagan has recused herself.
of african-americans born in the pre-civil rights rural south, that's a problem since many were delivered at home by midwives and recordkeeping was weak. the midwife who delivered raymond listed his first name as ramon and got his last name completely wrong, but his voter registration card has his correct name. >> do you vote? >> yes, i do. >> has this ever been a problem? >> voting? no, it hasn't been. >> reporter: but it could be now. rutherford says he can't get a photo id until he corrects his birth certificate, which requires an attorney he cannot afford. it is really difficult to get any kind of specific numbers as to how many voters could be impacted by the new south carolina law. according to the election commission, it could be anywhere from a high of 202,000 to a low of 51,000. >> i started looking at the numbers. i said, he is black, she's black, she's black, he -- i thought, god, this isracial. >> supporters of the new law says race has nothing to do with it. it's simply meant to protect against voter fraud, and there is a provision to allow voters like rutherford to cast a pr
started to add jobs in government. >> you're right. >> teachers, civil servants, et cetera. i see that as a net positive. >> unless there's a fiscal cliff and you won't be adding government jobs, that's for darn sure. >> let's talk a little bit about the middle, and for the people in the middle, you could argue that the middle class has demand an awful lot over the past 20 or 30 years that sort of led us to this debt problem, led us to this deficit problem. they want homeownership for everybody. we want tax cuts. we want medicare part "d." we want an expansion of safety net programs and then this is what happens. there's no one in the middle to figure out how to pay for all this stuff the middle has been getting. >> and that's really honestly what this election is about. i think one of the things that i found fascinating, although i didn't think they quite got there, is when the two candidates were asked about the role of government, because that's what elections are always about, it seems to me. i mean, yes, you know, it's about turning out your base and about this or that, but i
an ally. >>> 28 days to go until the election and we're looking in depth at voters in america. some civil rights activists are concerned about new voter i.d. laws. 31 states currently have voter i.d. laws in place. tennessee has one of the strictest. and former marine tim thompson is angry. >> hi. i'm tim thompson. i'm 56 years old. i'm a former united states marine. and i live here in nashville, tennessee. i'm against federal i.d. the way it is written right now. and we knew super tuesday was coming up, big scene, an i decided i needed to do something. i want to go down to the polling place and show my registration card like i've done for 37 years and see what they say to me. and, of course, they didn't allow me to vote. but then i told the polling director that i refuse to show you i.d. because i'm protesting the law. i'm giving up my right to vote today to fight for the rights of people that don't have this opportunity that want to vote but don't have the opportunity because they might not have that i.d. so the only weapon that an individual has in this country is his right to vote. an
. and that there would be civil action that would roll out right after trial. where does your client stand in that accusation? >> my client is here tomorrow for one purpose only and that is to come before the court to have the judge hear the impact mr. sandusky has had on life and to close this chapter. >> the university or any other body that he might be able to file action against. >> the claims against penn state are separate from the criminal process that mr. sandusky involved in here tomorrow. it's a totally separate matter. >> let me bring in paul about this notion of appeal. i haven't looked through trial record completely. there is usually something you can find, it's not always fate that you're going to get an appeal. from your recollection of this extraordinary case, is there something on which mr. sandusky might be able to hinlg? >> in criminal cases, you always have the right to appeal. it's a question of whether the appeal has merit. he'll be able to appeal. it will go all the way to the top court in the state probably, but yeah, he's got some arguments to make. there are thre
in the middle east. up next, the talks about syria's civil war, iran's nuclear program. my interview with the republican presidential nominee continues right after this. ♪ ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members know... how to harness that power, because we help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. >>> more now from my interview with republican presidential nominee mitt romney. i asked him about the very dangerous didn'tments taking place in the middle east right now. >> in syria you said you would identify members of the opposition and ensure they obtain arms to defeat al assad's tanks. how do you make sure those weapons don't get into the hands of terrorists or al qaeda? >> well, wolf, this is part
government. the rights of all their citizens, including women and minorities to insure space for civil society, free media, political parties, and an independent judiciary and to abide by their international commitments to protect our diplomats and our property. i'll champion free trade and restore it as a critical element of our strategy. both in the middle east and across the world. the president has not signed one free trade agreement. i'll work with nations around the world that are committed to the principles of free enterprise, expanding existing relationships, and establishing new ones. i'll support friends around the middle east that support our values and need help defending them. in libya i'll support the libyan people's efforts to forge a lasting government that represents all of them. i'll vigorously pursue the terrorists who attacked our consulate in benghazi and killed our fellow americans. in egypt i'll use our influence, including clear conditions on our aid to urge the new government to represent all egyptians, to build democratic institutions, and to maintain its peac
to suggest that there were financial motives. certainly victims do have a right to be compensated in the civil justice system if, in fact, there has been a conviction in the criminal justice system and sometimes even if there hasn't been a prosecution or a conviction. that doesn't mean that they were not telling the truth because they are seeking financial compensation. >> early this morning, gloria, i was talking to jeffrey fritz, the attorney for victim number four as that young man is now known. here is what he was telling me his client would say in court today. >> his reaction is that of anger. he will demonstrate to the court and tell the court and tell jerry sandusky what these crimes have done to him, his family and the lives of all the victims. >> what kind of an impact could that have on the judge? and how much time, realistically, do you think that jerry sandusky could get? >> well, he's going to get many, many years in prison. i would say that it's highly likely that he could spend the rest of his life in prison, unless and until, of course, if the case is reversed on a
about if they decide to retry the cases and what about the possibility of civil lawsuits? this could be a lot. >> wow. all right, susan in new york, appreciate it. thank you. >>> new developments today in the shooting that killed a u.s. border patrol agent. the fbi now thinks he may have died by friendly fire. the 30-year-old man was shot and killed this week in arizona. officials initially said he and his colleagues who were wounded in the incident, came under fire after responded to a sensor that went off, but authorities say the only shell casings found at the scene were those belonging to the agents. >> you know, investigators have made progress into the investigation, into agent ivy's death and are looking into the possibility that it was a tragic accident, the result of friendly fire. the fact is the work of the border patrol is dangerous. all of us who wear the uniform know this and yet this special breed of men and women willingly put themselves in harm's way to serve their country and to protect their communities. against those who wish to do us harm. >> that news comes as h
could be yours. ♪ >>> some very disturbing video from the front line of the syrian civil war. some children, particularly, may want to look away. what you see running there is a young syrian boy who was hit by sniper fire. you can see him right there. well, cnn can't independently confirm the video's authenticity. [ speaking foreign language ] >> this video is said to show a government aircraft going down in a damascus suburb. well, you can hear people shouting in arabic "god is the greatest" and there you see smoke billowing down from that downed jet, building up from that downed jet. >>> across syria optimists say 36 people are dead near a damascus suburb. it's an area they, "cleansed from terrorists." one involved the same turkish down with five civilians were hit last week. as the fighting continues, the united nations said syrians had fled the country, almost a third had fled. jordan and the u.n. are working to get children back in school but there are challenges. take a listen. >> there are two problems here in jordan. one is that i was just at the zatari camp near the border
state, psychologists, civil attorneys and other accusers. they won. >> you have a brand new statement from one of sandusky's victims? >> reporter: that's right. some of them will address the court directly. others will have statements read for them. but this is an exserpt from a victim who will speak in court and it says in part i hope and pray that when your honor sentences mr. sandusky you consider the real harm he's done to me and others and take into account the tears, pain and private anguish and others have suffered. again we'll hear from him as well as some others too. >> susan, what about the jurors? they were the ones who rendered this decision. i understand you spoke to one. >> reporter: that's right. they want closure too. this juror says she knows of at least four all together who will be here in the courtroom. what do they want to hear? they want to hear an apology. doesn't sound like they will get one. >> susan candiotti -- >> like to hear him say he's sorry and i want him to apologize and to recognize that what he did was wrong. but i don't believe that's what i'm going
the job. >> no, we're sending americans to do the job, fewer of them. >> that's right, we're sending more afghans to do the job. more afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria, where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year, president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> it's a different country. it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya. one fifth the population, five times as large geographically. you would not see whatever would come from that war, would seep into a regional war. are you in a count you are in a country that is heavily populated, in the most dangerous area in the world. and if, in fact, it blows up, the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region, causing potentially regional wars. we're working hand in glove with the turks,
is right for you. [ doctor ] enbrel, the number one biolog medicine prescribed by rheumatologists. >>> more fears that syria's civil war will escalate into a regional fight. for the fifth day in a row syrian army forces are exchanging fire with turkish troops on the border, and in northern syria here's what's happening. syrian troops, they are pushing to retake the key cities of homs and aleppo. opposition activists say at least 76 people have died across syria so far today. this is the suburb of aleppo in northern syria. the person who posted this video on youtube says it shows regime war planes attacking buses there and killing civilians. cnn has no way to independently verify the video. >>> well, empowerment. as children it wasn't a feeling that stella paul or humming bird knew. they didn't know it well at all. they learned find power from within. they broke free from lives of abuse and repression, and now through their work with world pulse and the power of social media they are teaching other women how to do the same. cnn is proud to support world pulse whose mission is to connect wome
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)